Mohammad Valipour

Keah Schuenemann

Keah Schuenemann, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Metropolitan State University of Denver. Her areas of expertise include climate change, Greenland, climate, sea ice, and weather. She teaches Dynamic Meteorology, Synoptic Meteorology, Global Climate Change, and Physics and Chemistry for Elementary Education Majors.

Schuenemann has taught at MSU Denver since 2010 and is the director of the General Studies program. She has co-authored several papers, including “Synoptic Forcing of Precipitation Over Greenland: Climatology for 1961–99” and “Changes in Synoptic Weather Patterns and Greenland Precipitation in the 20th and 21st Centuries.” Schuenemann studies the large-scale weather around the Greenland Ice Sheet, the effects of recent climate changes on these weather patterns, and the state of the ice sheet and its contribution to sea-level rise.

More recently, she began studying how Arctic sea-ice extent affects midlatitude weather patterns, which are potentially responsible for recent droughts and cold-air outbreaks. Schuenemann is also interested in the topic of communicating climate change, the misconceptions about climate change, and developing a pedagogy on teaching climate change based on current communicating of climate-change research. She is passionate about promoting science literacy and critical thinking in the sciences.

Schuenemann received her doctorate and her master’s in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2008 and 2006, respectively, and a bachelor’s in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science from the University of Wisconsin in 2004.

Jennifer Riley-Chetwynd

Jennifer Riley-Chetwynd has worked on water issues locally, nationally and internationally. She is the Director of Marketing and Social Responsibility at Denver Botanic Gardens, where she drives water-oriented programming, partnerships and communications. Prior to coming to the Gardens in 2011, Jennifer worked for Rain Bird, where she spearheaded the company’s Intelligent Use of Water initiatives. Jennifer is a board member of the Alliance for Water Efficiency, has served on the board of the American Public Gardens Association (APGA) and was the co-organizer for the 2011 International Water Forum at the United Nations.

Jennifer has an MBA from the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business, an MA in Latin American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin and a bachelor’s degree in Journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. She is the Co-Director of the One World One Water (OWOW) Center at MSU Denver, where she also teaches an environmental journalism course.

Elizabeth McVicker

Elizabeth McVicker, Ph.D., J.D., is a professor in the Department of Management at Metropolitan State University of Denver.

She serves as an advisor for student internships, independent studies, individualized degree program majors; and provides academic advice to management majors, MBA students and students interested in pursuing a study of law. McVicker was instrumental in the creation of MSU Denver’s One World One Water Center (OWOW) and the Water Studies curriculum. She also has her own practice.

Her service to the community includes serving on the boards of a water conservancy district, a water enterprise authority, a nation-wide water consortium serving coalitions and collaborations focused on water quality and restoration after major fires and floods and a state-wide basin roundtable. In 2011, McVicker received the Outstanding Women Award from the Institute of Women’s Studies and Services at MSU Denver, as well as the College of Business Dean’s Award for Overall Faculty Excellence.

Her research interests include legal issues surrounding constitutional law, employment and labor law; and water law within the context of regional, national and international perspectives.

McVicker received her juris doctorate from University of Denver, doctorate in Spanish language and literature from New York University, master’s from Johns Hopkins University and bachelor’s from University of Texas. She is a licensed attorney in the state of Colorado in good standing and is current with all required continuing legal education classes.

Uwe Kackstaetter

Uwe Richard Kackstaetter, Ph.D., is a professor of geology at Metropolitan State University of Denver. His expertise spans two continents from environmental testing of drinking water wells, groundwater flow modeling, site contaminant evaluations, as well as geologic and hydrologic field investigations.
As an educator, he taught in college and secondary classrooms, where he conducted numerous national and international geological field courses. Kackstaetter received the prestigious 2014 Faculty Senate teacher of the year award from MSU Denver. His current interests are in developing various practical approaches as advanced tools for the geosciences, such as automated percolation water testers, new wavelength dependent night prospecting tools, improved processes of rock and mineral thin sectioning, and clay mineral analytical processing and computations.
Kackstaetter, received his master’s in Geology from BYU, Provo and his Ph.D. in applied geology and mineralogy from the University of Würzburg, Germany.

See also http://college.earthscienceeducation.net/page2.html

April Hill

April Hill, Ph.D., is a professor and program director of Criminalistics in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Metropolitan State University of Denver. She has conducted research on water quality analysis, forensic chemical analysis, archaeochemistry and science education for the visually impaired.

During her graduate research, Hill completed 12 flights aboard NASA’s microgravity aircraft, affectionately known as the “Vomit Comet.” She then completed a post doctorate in education and outreach at Penn State University’s Center for Nanoscale Science, where Hill developed a passion for creating hands-on science experiences for the blind. Her work in this area has been published in the Journal of Chemical Education and was awarded a ChemLuminary Award from the American Chemical Society.

As a dedicated proponent of increasing minority participation in STEM fields, Hill serves on the steering committee for MSU Denver’s CO-WY AMP Program and as the academic advisor for the Women in Science student organization. Her current research efforts include projects in archaeochemistry, chemical education for students with visual impairments and forensic chemistry. She has collaborated with the Denver Museum of Nature & Science on several projects, including analyzing residues in ancient Mayan beer vessels to recreate an authentic Mayan beer and performing a demonstration of the Marsh Test for arsenic which was featured in the recent Poisons exhibit.

Hill received her doctorate in analytical chemistry and a graduate certificate of forensic science from Iowa State University in 2007. She completed her bachelor’s in chemistry and became ACS certified from Central College in Iowa in 2002.

Barb EchoHawk

Associate Professor Barbara EchoHawk, Ph.D., is an associate professor geology in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Metropolitan State University of Denver. She is an expert on high-resolution stratigraphy, engineering geology, energy and mineral resources, and the geology of Colorado and Wyoming. EchoHawk’s professional experience includes petroleum exploration and research, minerals exploration, engineering geology, and field investigations. She specializes in stratigraphy and sedimentology and is the “soft rock” (sedimentary geology and resources). EchoHawk received the 2016 MSU Denver Faculty Senate teaching in excellence award.

Tom Cech

Tom Cech, M.A., is the founding director of the One World One Water Center for Urban Water Education and Stewardship at Metropolitan State University of Denver. He retired from the University in 2021. Cech’s areas of expertise include water resources management and development, water education, water history, water law and water policy.

Cech was the executive director of the Central Colorado Water Conservancy District in Greeley for nearly 29 years. He also taught undergraduate and graduate level courses on water resources at University of Northern Colorado and Colorado State University for 11 years before joining MSU Denver in 2011. Cech received the Education and Public Service award in 2016 and the Diane Hoppe Leadership award in 2018.

As an expert source, he has authored/co-authored several published books including “Principles of Water Resources: History, Development, Management and Policy,” “Introduction to Water Resources and Environmental Issues” and “Colorado Water Law for Non-Lawyers.”

Cech received a master’s in community and regional planning from University of Nebraska, Lincoln and a bachelor’s in math education from University of Nebraska at Kearney.

Randi Brazeau

Randi Brazeau, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Metropolitan State University of Denver. She teaches courses in environmental and water resources. Brazeaus areas of expertise include water quality, premise plumbing water quality, water contamination/spill events, water resource management, stormwater, erosion control/construction and water.

Brazeau received her Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 2012, a master’s degree in 2006 and a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Florida in 2005.

Tom Bellinger

Thomas R. Bellinger, Ph.D., is an affiliate professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Metropolitan State University of Denver.

Bellinger has over 35 years of experience in the areas of watershed hydrology, hydrologic modeling, military remote sensing technology with regard to water/natural resources and federal (Native American) water right negotiations. He currently serves as a technical advisor (hydrology) with the Department of Interior/USAID International Technical Assistance Program (ITAP) and is an active team member working with the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment). Bellinger retired as the principal hydrologist from the Department of Interior Bureau of Reclamation, Technical Service Center in Denver in 2008 and joined MSU Denver as a visiting professor. He also worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Office in Denver and the former Reclamation Southwest Regional office in Amarillo, Texas. He is also a retired Navy Veteran.

Bellinger currently serves as a hydrologist with NecroSearch International (NSI). In the Navy, he served as a cryptologic technician, a naval intelligence officer and retired at the rank of Lieutenant Commander. He is a member of several professional associations and has authored a variety of journal articles, research papers and government reports on several aspects of the hydrologic and water sciences.

Bellinger received his doctorate in organizational management and leadership with a focus on water resources from University of Phoenix in 2008, a master’s in forest influences with a hydrology concentration and a bachelor’s in resources management and forestry from The State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, New York in 1982 and 1978 respectfully. He is a certified professional hydrologist through the American Institute of Hydrology.

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