Jeremy Castle

Castle, Jeremy

Topics:

Journalism and Mass Communication, Politics and Media, Politics/Public Policy, Religion

Expertise:

United States elections, Public opinion, Polarization, Religion and politics, Church and State, Media and politics


Degree: Ph.D.

Title: Assistant Professor

Department: Political Science

Email: jcastl11@msudenver.edu

External Links:

https://jeremycastle15.wixsite.com/home


Biography:

Jeremy Castle, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Metropolitan State University of Denver. His areas of expertise include United States elections, public opinion, polarization, religion and politics, church and state, and media and politics. Castle currently teaches American National Government and Conducting Political Analysis.

Prior to joining MSU Denver, Castle worked as a lecturer and postdoctoral teaching fellow at Central Michigan University. He received an honorable mention during his time as a Presidential Fellow in the graduate research fellowship at the University of Notre Dame. He was awarded several grants for research projects, including grants from the Rooney Center for American Democracy.

Castle’s research areas include political polarization; religion and politics; and media and politics, especially how popular films and pop culture influences public opinion. His primary research examines the role of religion in political polarization in the United States. He also has studied Martin Luther King Jr.'s contributions to political philosophy. Castle’s work includes "The Effect of the #MeToo Movement on Political Engagement and Ambition in 2018" published in Political Research Quarterly and "New Fronts in the Culture Wars?: Religion, Partisanship, and Polarization on Transgender Rights and Religious Liberty in the United States," published in American Politics Research.

Castle received both his doctorate and master's degrees in political science from the University of Notre Dame in 2015 and 2012, respectively. He received his bachelor’s degree in political science from Hanover College in 2010.